What is a Jeroboam? A Guide to Wine Bottle Sizes

Did you know there are way many more options of wine bottle sizes beyond the standard 750ml bottle? It’s easy to become overwhelmed by the various wine bottle sizes that are available. There is a lot of information out there about which bottles you should serve, and how much they cost. However, it can be difficult to find an article that outlines the different sizes of wine bottles in one place- until now! In this blog post, we will discuss what a Jeroboam is, as well as all the other wine bottle sizes and how much wine they contain.

Half Quarter: 93.5ml (1/8 Bottle)

A half quarter is often known as a “Topette” and is typically used as a sample bottle.

Quarter Bottle: 187ml (1/4 bottle)

A quarter bottle is often known as “Piccolo” and contains about as much wine as a standard single glass of wine.

Half Bottle: 375ml (1/2 bottle)

A half bottle might commonly be called “Demi” or “Split.” It’s typically 9 1/2” tall and contains about two glasses of wine by volume.

Standard: 750ml (1 bottle)

A standard bottle is the most popular-sized wine bottle and the one you are used to seeing at wineries and in stores. It offers 4-6 glasses of wine. Heights vary from 12″ to 13″ and bottles are typically 3 3/8” wide.

Magnum: 1.5 Liters (2 bottles)

A magnum bottle of wine is the equivalent of 2 standard bottles. It is typically 14″ in height and 4 1/2” wide. It contains enough wine for 8-12 glasses.

Jeroboam: 3 Liters (4 bottles)

A Jeroboam is also known as a “Double Magnum.” It is typically 18″ in height and 5” wide. It contains the equivalent of 4 standard bottles of wine!

Rehoboam: 4.5 Liters (6 bottles)

A rehoboam is typically reserved for champagne. These bottles are 19.5″ in height and contain the equivalent of 6 standard bottles.

Bordeaux Jeroboam: 5 Liters (6.75 bottles)

A bordeaux jeroboam is just slightly larger than a rehoboam and contains the equivalent of 6.75 standard bottles, or about 34 servings.

Imperial: 6 Liters (8 bottles)

Imperials are shaped like a standard wine bottle and are used for red or white wine and contain the equivalent of 8 bottles of wine.

Methuselah: 6 Liters (8 bottles)

Similar to Imperials, Methuselah also contains 6 liters or 8 equivalent bottles of wine. The difference between the two is the liquid they contain. The Methuselah is usually reserved for champagne or sparkling wine and comes in a sloped shoulder bottle.

Salmanzar: 9 Liters (12 bottles)

A Salmanazar is generally 25″ in height and contains the equivalent of 12 wine bottles worth of wine!

Balthazar: 12 Liters (16 bottles)

Even larger than the salmanzar is the balthazar bottle. These are typically 28″ in height and contain 16 standard bottles worth of wine or 80 standard glasses of wine.

Nebuchanezzar: 15 Liters (20 bottles)

At 31″ tall, the nebuchanezzar contains 20 bottles worth of wine.

Melchoir: 18 Liters (24 bottles)

Melchoir bottles are 36″ tall and contain 24 bottles of wine in a single bottle, that equals about 120 servings!

Solomon: 20 Liters (26 bottles)

Solomon bottles are typically reserved for Champagne. This sized bottle is the equivalent of 26 standard wine bottles.

Sovereign: 25 Liters (33.3 bottles)

A sovereign bottle contains 33.3 wine bottles worth of wine.

Goliath: 27 Liters (36 bottles)

A Goliath, in the wine world, is equivalent to 36 bottles of wine or about 180 servings of wine. It might also be known as a “Primat.”

Melchizedek: 30 Liters (40 bottles)

Melchizedek bottles are traditionally reserved for champagne and contain the equivalent of 40 bottles worth of wine.

Conclusion

The size of a wine bottle not only changes the amount of servings per bottle and the appearance as you serve the wine, but it can actually change the taste of the wine! Large format wine bottles age more slowly and are believed to develop more complexity and nuances than wines of smaller bottle sizes. This is due to the smaller amount of air (oxygen and sulfur dioxide) that exists between the cork and liquid.

We hope you learned something fun and useful from this guide!